Tag Archives: Privilege

Cross-post: Cisgender Privilege List

15 Dec
I found this laying around the office the other day, and was deeply moved by it. I think it’s worth a read and a discussion.. Can you think of any other cis privileges that come to mind?

Cisgender Privilege List


From Peggy McIntosh’s White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack

1) Strangers don’t assume they can ask me what my genitals look like and how I have sex.
2) My validity as a man/woman/human is not based upon how much surgery I’ve had or how well I “pass” as a non-Trans person.
3) When initiating sex with someone, I do not have to worry that they won’t be able to deal with my parts or that having sex with me will cause my partner to question his or her own sexual orientation.
4) I am not excluded from events which are either explicitly or de facto* men-born-men or women-born-women only. (*possibly anything involving nudity)
5) My politics are not questioned based on the choices I make with regard to my body.
6) I don’t have to hear “So have you had THE surgery?” or “Oh, so you’re REALLY a [incorrect sex or gender]?” each time I come out to someone.
7) I am not expected to constantly defend my medical decisions.
8 ) Strangers do not ask me what my “real name” [birth name] is and then assume that they have a right to call me by that name.
9) People do not disrespect me by using incorrect pronouns even after they’ve been corrected.
10) I do not have to worry that someone wants to be my friend or have sex with me in order to prove his or her “hipness” or “good” politics.
11) I do not have to worry about whether I will be able to find a safe and accessible bathroom or locker room to use.
12) When engaging in political action, I do not have to worry about the gendered repercussions of being arrested. (i.e. What will happen to me if the cops find out that my genitals do not match my gendered appearance? Will I end up in a cell with people of my own gender?)
13) I do not have to defend my right to be a part of “Queer” space or movement, and lesbian, gay, and bisexual people will not try to exclude me from our movements in order to gain political legitimacy for themselves.
14) My experience of gender (or gendered spaces) is not viewed as “baggage” by others of the gender in which I live.
15) I do not have to choose between either invisibility (“passing”) or being consistently “othered” and/or tokenized based on my gender.
16) I am not told that my sexual orientation and gender identity are mutually exclusive.
17) When I go to the gym or a public pool, I can use the showers.
18) If I end up in the emergency room, I do not have to worry that my gender will keep me from receiving appropriate treatment nor will all of my medical issues be seen as a product of my gender. (“Your nose is running and your throat hurts? Must be due to the hormones!”)
19) My health insurance provider (or public health system) does not specifically exclude me from receiving benefits or treatments available to others because of my gender.
20) When I express my internal identities in my daily life, I am not considered “mentally ill” by the medical establishment.
21) I am not required to undergo extensive psychological evaluation in order to receive basic medical care.
22) The medical establishment does not serve as a “gatekeeper” which disallows self-determination of what happens to my body.
23) People do not use me as a scapegoat for their own unresolved gender issues.

Women in Voluntary Sex Work: Review, Perspectives, and Implications for Practice

17 Oct

This is a rather long, intensive, academically written paper from early in my graduate studies on different perspectives in sex work, from several feminist perspectives, as well as implications for social work practice. I am putting it up here (even though it’s more dry and paper-ey than blog-ey) because I think it offers a good introduction to the  topic, and some of you may find it interesting. I, myself, am a giant geek, and love reading and writing these kinds of things- I will trust that some other giant geeks are following the blog! 🙂  Here is an outline of sections, so you can know what you’re in for before diving in:

  • A Brief History of Modern Prostitution 1900 – Present
  • Structures of Modern Sex Work
  • Outdoor Sex Work
  • Indoor Sex Work
  • Perspectives on Sex Work (this is where all the juicy stuff on sexism, racism, and arguments about sex work within the world of feminism is hiding)
  • Implications for Social Work

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The conversations you never have: taking a look at monogamous privilege

11 Oct

[[17Oct2011 EDIT: Thank you Bahli for the link! It seems somebody else has created a list of monogamous privileges. Check it out- it’s much more comprehensive than what I cover here and worth a read.]]

Just a quickie today, and I’m hoping for a lot of audience participation (I know y’all are out there reading, I see the stats, come comment!). Tell me the relationship privilege you’ve noticed!

I generally don’t make a big deal about being poly. I slip it into conversation where it’s appropriate, “oh, my sweetie’s girlfriend had a similar experience,” “yes, my sweetie works at xyz university…. yes I know I said he lives overseas, that’s a different sweetie,” and so on and so forth. Often, this immediately halts the conversation as people request clarification.

Now, don’t get me wrong, I love educating. It’s one of my passions! But, there are times when I really wish I could just talk about my life, without having to go into a long explanation of how it works… And it’s at those times that I realize that it’s a kind of monogamous privilege, the ability to talk about your life and love without people needing heavy explanation or defense.

So, in the spirit of Peggy McIntosh, I want to start thinking and talking about monogamous privilege. This isn’t meant to be a negative conversation about monogamy, I am totally into the idea of all kinds of relationship structures, as long as they’re what people want to be doing- but I do think it’s important that individuals within a majority population recognize the privilege they have in some circumstances, even if it’s small social details.

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